The MathJax project was founded on the belief web technology has reached a stage of development where a JavaScript math display engine can offer a genuine solution for math and science communication on the web. There have been many efforts in the past that led to various means of putting math on the web, but to date it can be argued none have achieved the status of a generally acknowledged solution to the problem. We think that the key characteristics of anything claiming to be a solution must include:

  • high-quality display of math in all modern browsers without any setup on the part of the reader
  • cut and paste interoperability for easy reuse of mathematics
  • accessibility for those with disabilities
  • integration with other web applications

We believe MathJax meets those criteria, and will only improve as we continue to hone our code, and as browsers and web technology advance.

However, there is another characteristic that is critical in order for a solution for math and science communication on the web to have real impact: scale. Network effects are important on the web. Cut and paste interoperability matters more when there are lots of valuable applications to cut and paste between. Accessibility becomes more meaningful when it isn’t just an isolated page here and there, but all the linked references as well. Performance improves when scripts are already in your cache.

If you are interested in working with us to bring the benefits of scale to MathJax, take a look at our MathJax Business Development Manager position. We are seeking a person to work with publishers, professional societies, elearning organizations and similar projects to inform them about MathJax, to help identify roadblocks we can remove, or services we can develop, to further MathJax adoption. For a person who is good with people, and cares about making a contribution to math and science communication, this is a great opportunity.